Check-in Culture

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Check-in Culture

We touched on the importance of manager-employee bonds in our post on Gen Zs in accounting. But, here, we’ll dive into how to cultivate strong bonds via a “check-in culture” and, consequently, keep your team engaged.

Annual Reviews Aren’t Cutting It

According to Rita Keller, a prominent voice in CPA firm management, annual performance appraisals are dead. Keller insists that check-ins, even more frequently than weekly, can be useful for keeping employees engaged and keeping intra-team bonds strong. Citing insights from author, motivational speaker and business consultant Marcus Buckingham, Keller asserts these check-ins don’t necessarily have to be lengthy to be effective.

Best Practices for Check-ins

This Workhuman article outlined some stellar best practices when having these check-ins:

  • Let the employee drive. The employee should be empowered to schedule check-ins and drive the content within a broad framework.
  • Keep them separate. Do not clump the different types of check-ins together in the same meeting. Otherwise, issues from one discussion will spill over into another discussion. (The 3 types of check-ins the article outlines are goal-setting check-ins, ongoing check-ins and career check-ins.)
  • Embrace a growth mindset. Always assume the employee can learn, grow, and expand.
  • Open up. Each person should come to the check-in with a mindset of trust, honesty, and positive intent. Even if there are difficult topics that need to be discussed, remaining open creates a safe environment where an authentic conversation can occur.
  • Actively listen. Try to keep multitasking – such as checking texts or emails – to a minimum. When both parties are actively listening, the chance of miscommunication decreases and trust increases.”

Measuring Employee Engagement

There are tons of methods and tools you can deploy to measure employee engagement. If you decide to go the anonymous, direct feedback route, we suggest taking a look at Gallup’s 12 Questions for Employee Engagement. This survey has been used across 70 million employees over 30 years. Be sure to create a set-up that will allow employees to feel comfortable answering these questions candidly.

Free up your team from admin work

Check-in Culture

We touched on the importance of manager-employee bonds in our post on Gen Zs in accounting. But, here, we’ll dive into how to cultivate strong bonds via a “check-in culture” and, consequently, keep your team engaged.

Annual Reviews Aren’t Cutting It

According to Rita Keller, a prominent voice in CPA firm management, annual performance appraisals are dead. Keller insists that check-ins, even more frequently than weekly, can be useful for keeping employees engaged and keeping intra-team bonds strong. Citing insights from author, motivational speaker and business consultant Marcus Buckingham, Keller asserts these check-ins don’t necessarily have to be lengthy to be effective.

Best Practices for Check-ins

This Workhuman article outlined some stellar best practices when having these check-ins:

  • Let the employee drive. The employee should be empowered to schedule check-ins and drive the content within a broad framework.
  • Keep them separate. Do not clump the different types of check-ins together in the same meeting. Otherwise, issues from one discussion will spill over into another discussion. (The 3 types of check-ins the article outlines are goal-setting check-ins, ongoing check-ins and career check-ins.)
  • Embrace a growth mindset. Always assume the employee can learn, grow, and expand.
  • Open up. Each person should come to the check-in with a mindset of trust, honesty, and positive intent. Even if there are difficult topics that need to be discussed, remaining open creates a safe environment where an authentic conversation can occur.
  • Actively listen. Try to keep multitasking – such as checking texts or emails – to a minimum. When both parties are actively listening, the chance of miscommunication decreases and trust increases.”

Measuring Employee Engagement

There are tons of methods and tools you can deploy to measure employee engagement. If you decide to go the anonymous, direct feedback route, we suggest taking a look at Gallup’s 12 Questions for Employee Engagement. This survey has been used across 70 million employees over 30 years. Be sure to create a set-up that will allow employees to feel comfortable answering these questions candidly.